Help assemble boxes to be distributed.

A teen, junior or youth leader is an older 4-H member who develops leadership skills by teaching other 4-H members. Teen leaders gain experience teaching, working with others and taking on responsibilities under the guidance of an adult volunteer.

A short-term volunteer teaches a special interest program, such as babysitting, first aid or flower arranging, and/or assists a 4-H group with a special project.

A project leader teaches members in a specific project area, such as rabbits, computers or fashion review. You can expect to spend 1-2 hours of preparation time for every 1 hour of club or project activity. Leaders’ meetings or other training may be held for 1-2 hours each month.

A 4-H club team, general or organizational leader provides overall leadership to the club, oversees the group structure and operation, while serving as the club’s contact with Extension employees and the 4-H Council. They coordinate members, parents and other leaders. 4-H club leaders act as individuals, a team or a group of people, each of…

An afterschool or school enrichment volunteer teaches 4-H curriculum, such as gardening, science or arts and crafts, to an Afterschool group or school class(es).

An activity leader helps members plan and conduct group activities such as community service, recreation, fundraising or drama. You can expect to spend 1-2 hours of preparation time for every 1 hour of club or project activity. Leaders’ meetings or other training may be held for 1-2 hours each month.

A chaperone leads a group of youth at 4-H Camp, or state and national leadership conferences or contests.

A resource leader serves as a resource to leaders or members in a specific project or activity area.

4-H volunteers can serve on camp planning committees and leaders’ councils, teach workshops, raise funds, recruit new members or volunteers, judge at fairs and contests or organize events. 4-H is flexible and can be suited to a variety of lifestyles.

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